You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Food’ category.

Sorry it’s been a while since my last post … sadly, my job’s been keeping me busy, too busy to do any cooking or baking, let alone try out new recipes.

But I’d just discovered the Food Network a few days ago when I was changing my cable plan. And the first show I’d watched on that channel was a pretty funny one by the witty Alton Brown … Good Eats.

Not only does Alton show us how to cook … eh, well … good eats, of course, but he also gets educational with the history, science and nuggets of information about those good eats, all accompanied by some humor. Check his show out on your TV or the episodes available on YouTube.

And so, here I was … while laughing with Alton, he showed how easy it was to make soft, homemade pretzels. And here’s my yummy attempt at making those same pretzels …

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Pasta sauces are one ingredient I don’t usually make at home … I have made my own pasta sauce from scratch, but somehow, making homemade pasta sauces does not interest me as much as baking breads or roasting chickens & turkeys.

So, for spaghetti nights, I would usually go with pasta sauces readily available in jars from the stores & supermarkets. But I would still liven up these pre-made sauces and this is how I would do it most times … Read the rest of this entry »

My kid was helping me make spaghetti bolognese the other day and she had found from the Food Network, a technique to easily remove the skin from tomatoes. And it really did make it easier to peel the tomato skins off!

Later, I learnt that this is the same technique taught by the Culinary Institute of America in their book, The Professional Chef.

Here’s my description of the technique to easily peel tomatoes … Read the rest of this entry »

So, we had homemade pizza over the weekend … there’s nothing like making your own pizza, right? Not only can you control what and how much (or how little) of the toppings you want on your own pizza, but you can also choose the best quality ingredients you can find or afford for the toppings & dough!

And if you have kids, the pizza making is a great way to bond and spend time with them. They can help to prepare the dough and toppings, roll out their own crusts and top their own pizzas any way they like (within reason, of course 🙂 ). It’s also a good way to get them to eat if they are choosy or picky eaters … let them choose & top their pizzas to make them feel that the pizzas they make from start to finish are really theirs, which should help ensure they’ll eat them.

My kid enjoyed helping me weigh and mix the dough ingredients, and I’d even let her slice the ham (obviously, I was hovering over her shoulder, worried that she might cut herself). She made for herself a smoked ham, mozzarella & Parmesan cheese pizza, stretching out her own pizza dough and spreading a base of a tomato-based pasta sauce that supplied her vegetable diet needs (she doesn’t like to eat vegetables but will eat a bit of such tomato-based pasta sauces). She happily devoured almost the whole 12″ pizza (less a 1/6th slice)! I think that’s quite a lot of pizza for a slim 10-year old, right?

I made fully loaded pizzas for my significant other & I, using good quality pepperoni, smoked ham, red & green capsicums, onions, fresh white button mushrooms, black olives, mozzarella and freshly grated Parmesan cheese on a bed of the tomato-based pasta sauce over a moderately thin crust. The crust was made from what I call Savory Olive Oil Dough, which has garlic powder and onion powder for additional flavor.

Here’s my recipe to make the dough … Read the rest of this entry »

Chili crab is a very popular dish in Singapore and Malaysia. Although I’ve never tried making it myself before, I discovered a post card that was made to publicize this signature dish for The Singapore Food Festival last year, and I thought I’d share it with everyone (with some minor edits & corrections to a couple of what I think were errors in the recipe along with some additional notes) …

Read the rest of this entry »

If you’ve been following Pat Geyer’s blog, The Rantings of an Amateur Chef … oh! You have not? Well, I highly suggest you do … his blog is chock full of great recipes with lots of photos showing the various steps in making the delicious food!

… ehhh, where was I? Oh yeah, if you’ve been following The Rantings of an Amateur Chef, you would have come across his family’s pretty simple traditional Roast Thanksgiving Turkey, the key to which is the binary basting sauce of butter and red wine.

With this simple combination of just two ingredients for the basting sauce, you can easily imagine the wonderful glaze and taste of the finished turkey, right?

Since I was already planning to roast a humble chicken, I decided to try his basting sauce on the turkey’s smaller cousin.

Unfortunately, although I had lots of butter, my pantry was a bit sparse for red wine. But I did find some Chinese rice wine (like Pagoda Shao Hsing Hua Tiao Chiew).

I felt butter may not go well with the rice wine, so I decided to change the oil to something more Asian to suit the rice wine: sesame oil with vegetable oil.

So, I ended up with a different basting sauce, albeit originally based on Pat’s Thanksgiving Turkey recipe. And as I had some fresh capsicums and button mushrooms, I thought … why not slice them, toss them with some of the very fragrant basting sauce and roast them with the chicken?

So, with a tip of the hat to Pat, here’s …

Read the rest of this entry »

Well, the Pain de Mie is now thoroughly cooled and ready to be sliced and compared to store-bought sliced white sandwich bread (which we’ll just call a “SB” for short).

First, here’s my Pain de Mie (aka, “my loaf”) compared against what the Pain de Mie is supposed to look liked, from King Arthur Flour’s blog (aka, “KAF loaf”) … here’s the whole loaf before they are sliced (my loaf is on the left while the right one is the KAF loaf) …

My underachieving loaf did not rise enough to fill the pan fully, resulting in the shorter, dome-topped loaf instead of a nice, squared loaf. Read the rest of this entry »

Here’s the recipe by the good people at King Arthur Flour, for making a traditional Pain de Mie using a 13″ long Pullman lidded loaf pan. This recipe is reproduced and adapted from their Bakers’ Banter blog, while this other post on their blog has great photos of the Pain de Mie being made and what it looks like after baking. Read the rest of this entry »

Okay, with the results of Trial #1, I’ve decided to increase the amount of sugar (to make the bread sweeter) as well as increase the potato flour to improve on the softness of the bread.

Here’re the ingredients and method for Trial #2 … Read the rest of this entry »

It’s the next day, so let us see how well my first try at making the Softest White Sandwich Bread is.

A slice of Trial #1 is on the left and a slice of store-bought bread is on the right in comparison …

20120605-084130.jpg Read the rest of this entry »